Thatta

Ninety-eight km to east of Karachi, on the National Highway, lays the ancient town of Thatta, once called the EI Darodo of the East. This busy river port of yore – before the Indus moved off to the east is now famous for some of the most picturesque and interesting specimen of Muslim architecture. Although the vestiges of past glories are of comparatively recent origin, dating back to 16th and 17th centuries, the history of Thatta goes back some two thousand years.

The palaces and pleasure houses have become one with dust but many of the tombs, mausoleums and mosques remain, some of them in a fairly good state of preservation. Prominent among the town’s present day brick and adobe structures are the wind catchers that top them – a cooling device that serves well during the long blistering summers. Amidst Thatta’s narrow alleys and lanes, are quaint bazaars that offer hand blocked and hand dyed fabrics, embroidery work and bead necklaces.

Shah Jehani Mosque
Shah Jehani mosque situated on Thatta’s outskirts, is representative of Muslim architecture. It was built in 1647 A.D. by the Mughal Emperor Shah Jehan, and is said to have the most elaborated display of blue and white tile work in the sub-continent. Its 93 domes, designed for its acoustical carry the voice of the Imam to all parts of the mosque.

Keenjhar Lake
This beautiful man-made lake is a combination of two natural lakes called Sunheri and Keenjhar. The place has been developed into a resort with boating and fishing facilities. Accommodation is available at the lakeside motel. It is two hours drive and 115 km away from Karachi.